Officers Reports and Recommendations of Council Committees

Planning and Engineering Services Committee

PD-048/18 Proposed Section 40 Liquor Licence – Extension of Licence Hours (Shoalwater Football Club)

In September 2011, the City granted a Section 40 Certificate for the Hillman Hornets Cricket Club to operate from the clubroom on the reserve, subject to the following conditions:

  1. In the event of the City receiving any substantiated resident complaints regarding crowd noise or anti-social behaviour of patrons, the operating times may be changed at the discretion of the Department of Racing, Gaming and Liquor.
  2. The business must operate at all times in accordance with the House Management Plan supplied with the application.

In February 2017, the City granted a Section 40 Certificate for the Shoalwater Football Club, which also operates from the clubroom on the reserve, subject to the following conditions:

  1. The trading hours are restricted to between 6.00pm to 9.00pm on Wednesdays and 12:00 noon to 7.00pm on Sundays only.
  2. The sale and supply of alcohol is restricted to members of the Shoalwater Football Club and to the guests of that member in the company of that member only.
  3. Patrons arriving and departing the premises must do so in a responsible manner to ensure the amenity of neighbours is maintained at all times.
  4. All rubbish within the licensed area being disposed of in a waste receptacle following club activities.
  5. In the event of the City receiving any substantiated resident complaints regarding crowd noise or anti-social behaviour of patrons, the operating times may be changed at the discretion of the Department of Racing, Gaming and Liquor.
  6. The House Management Policy and Code of Conduct Management Plan must be complied with at all times.

The Hillman Hornets Cricket Club use the reserve and clubroom during summer, whilst the Shoalwater Football Club use the clubroom and reserve in winter. The City has not received any complaints regarding the Hillman Hornets Cricket Club or Shoalwater Football Club relating to their liquor licenses.

The applicant is seeking approval for a Section 40 Certificate to extend the licenced trading hours for the Shoalwater Football Club.

A Section 40 Certificate from the City is required to accompany any Liquor Licence application made to the Department of Racing, Gaming and Liquor. Details of the Section 40 Certificate application are below;

  • The Wednesday trading hours are to be extended from 9:00pm to 10:00pm, with the consumption of alcohol to take place within the clubroom only (see Diagram 5);
  • No proposed change to Sunday trading hours; and
  • The revised Liquor Licence will grant permission for patrons to be served alcohol on Wednesday evenings between 6:00pm – 10:00pm and on Sundays between 12:00 noon – 7:00pm.

The applicant’s (summarised) reasons for the additional hours are:

  • The Club is a Masters Club (members are over 35 years of age) and most of its members routinely work long hours and cannot get to training before 7:00pm;
  • Many of its members have obligations with their children after work, such as taking them to/collecting them from activities, meaning the members cannot get to training before 7:00pm;
  • A number of members do not live in the Shoalwater/Rockingham area which also makes it more difficult for them to get to training before 7:00pm;
  • Much needed funds that the Club can generate on its Wednesday night training night is limited due to the 9:00pm restriction; and
  • The net result is that after training there is only limited time to use the bar. This makes the Club less attractive to members and prospective members.

 

PD-049/18 Karnup Locality Boundary – Public Submissions

In June 2018, Council resolved to support three options being explored in relation to the Singleton/Karnup locality boundary changes, as follows:

  • Option One – (Merge) the land known as “Vista Private Estate”, including the area bounded
    by Mandurah Road, Paganoni Road, Mandurah Railway line and the City of Rockingham
    district boundary being included in the suburb of “Singleton”; or
  • Option Two – (Status Quo) the land known as “Vista Private Estate”, including the area bounded by Mandurah Road, Paganoni Road, Railway Line and the City of Rockingham district boundary remaining as “Karnup”; or
  • Option Three – (Rename) the land known as “Vista Private Estate”, including the area east of Mandurah Road, south of Paganoni Road, west of the Kwinana Freeway and to the southern boundary of the City of Rockingham, being included in the new locality of “Paganoni”.

Subject to public consultation with the following;

  • A preferential vote being carried out to all affected owners and residents within the “Vista Private Estate” and east of Mandurah Road via letter with self-replied envelopes;
  • Rockingham District Historical Society Inc;
  • Singleton Residents Association; and
  • Baldivis Residents Association.

The City posted 580 surveys requesting preferred locality name to all of the owners and residents within the “Vista Private Estate” and east of Mandurah Road via letter with self-replied envelopes. Survey responses were also sought from the Rockingham District Historical Society Inc, Singleton Residents Association (SRA) and Baldivis Residents Association.

A total of 192 survey responses were received by the City, including 15 late submissions. This is a 33% survey response rate which is considered to be an above average return rate for a survey and is therefore a reliable sample.

A total of 104 (54%) respondents supported Option One – merge with Singleton, while Option two included 69 (36%) and Option Three included 19 (10%) of the responses. While most respondents supported a locality merge with Singleton, this view was not a majority view as Option Two (Status Quo) Karnup still had strong support and Option Three (Rename) to Paganoni had some support.

Survey results are expressed in Table 1 as percentage of the overall number of surveys sent out (580) and in Table 2 separately as a percentage of the surveys that were returned (192).

The figures below show that most (67%) of the surveys were not completed. Non responses (neutral) cannot be considered as tacit support for any of the options.

Options:
Option One – (Merge) Singleton 18%
Option Two – (StatusQuo) Karnup 12%
Option Three – (Rename) Paganoni 3%
No response (Neutral) 67%

 

PD-050/18 Proposed Road Dedication – Golden Bay Foreshore

In March 2012, the Golden Bay Structure Plan was adopted by the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) replacing the previous Comprehensive Development Plan for Golden Bay.

In May 2012, Council resolved to support the Foreshore Management Plan with minor modifications as requested by the Department of Planning. The Foreshore Management Plan was prepared in consultation with the former Department of Environment and Conservation, the Department of Planning’s Coastal Planning Branch, the Department of Transport, the local community and the City.

The Foreshore Management Plan included a coastal vulnerability assessment as per State Planning Policy 2.6: State Coastal Planning.

It is proposed to dedicate a new road within the Golden Bay Foreshore, which upon construction, will provide access consistent with the approved Foreshore Management Plan.

It is proposed that only the section of road within the boundary of Reserve 27066 (as highlighted grey) is to be dedicated under the LA Act. The two connecting road portions located in balance of title of Peet/Department of Housing Land (not highlighted in grey) will be transferred to the City separately, as part of a future subdivision stage of Golden Bay Estate.

Golden Bay Road

 

 

PD-051/18 City of Rockingham Bushfire Risk Management Plan 2018 – 2022

State Hazard Plan for Fire (Westplan – Fire)

Westplan – Fire requires all Local Governments with significant bushfire risk to prepare an integrated Bushfire Risk Management Plan (BRM Plan) outlining a strategy to treat bushfire related risk across all land tenures.

Community Plan Strategy – Bushfire Risk Mitigation

The City has responsibilities for planning, preparation, response and recovery relating to bushfire, as well as land use planning decision making and enforcement roles. Acknowledging this, the Chief

  • Executive Officer prepared a Bushfire Risk Discussion paper in December 2014 that:
  • Acknowledged the changing bushfire environment;
  • Identified the risks to the City;
  • Established key actions for further clarification; and
  • Proposed to develop a Community Plan Strategy to address bushfire risk mitigation.

In August 2017, the Council adopted the Community Plan Strategy – Bushfire Risk Mitigation (CPS), which contains outcomes applicable to the BRM Plan. The purpose of this CPS is to identify and outline the City’s role in providing for improved protection against bushfires and to establish a culture of community awareness of bushfires. A City wide, tenure blind, BRM Plan, also required under Westplan – Fire, is a key element of the CPS.

Warnbro Dunes Pilot Project BRM Plan

Due to the complexities associated with the preparation of a BRM Plan for the whole Local Government area, it was decided that a pilot project BRM Plan should be undertaken within the Warnbro Dunes. This pilot project was used to iron out any issues with methodology and implementation for the City wide assessment as well as expediting attention to an area with extreme bushfire risk. In May 2015, Council endorsed the preparation of the pilot project and it has been implemented successfully since.

The City’s BRM Plan is a strategic document that identifies all assets at risk from bushfire and their priority for treatment.

The aim of the BRM Plan is to document a coordinated an efficient approach towards the identification, assessment and treatment of assets (Human Settlement, Economic, Environmental and Cultural) exposed to bushfire-related risk within the City.

The BRM Plan intends to effectively manage bushfire risk within the City in order to protect people, assets and other things of local value. Specifically, the objectives of this BRM Plan are to:

  • Guide and coordinate a tenure blind, multi-agency bushfire risk management program over a five year period;
  • Document the process used to identify, analyse and evaluate risk, determine priorities and develop a plan to systematically treat risk;
  • Facilitate the effective use of the financial and physical resources available for bushfire risk management activities;
  • Integrate bushfire risk management into the business processes of local government, land owners and other agencies;
  • Ensure there is integration between land owners and bushfire risk management programs and activities; and
  • Monitor and review the implementation of treatments to ensure treatment plans are adaptable and risk is managed at an acceptable level.

As custodian of the BRM Plan, the City is responsible for the coordination of the development and ongoing review of the integrated BRM Plan as well as:

  • Negotiation of commitment from land owners to treat risks identified in the BRM Plan; and
  • As a treatment manager, implementation of treatment strategies on City owned and managed land.

The BRM Plan process is supported by an online portal called the Bushfire Risk Management System (BRMS) which provides an integrated system to spatially identify assets at risk from bushfire, plan treatments and report progress against the BRM Plan. The Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) is the custodian of BRMS.

 

EP-012/18 Recommendation from the Coastal Facilities Advisory Committee Meeting held on 27 August 2018 (Absolute Majority)

Advisory Committee Recommendation 1 of 1: Change of Membership Composition of Coastal Facilities Advisory Committee

That Council AMENDS the composition of the Coastal Facilities Advisory Committee to the following:

  • 2 Councillors
  • 2 community members
  • 1 representative from Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions
  • 1 representative from Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development
  • 1 representative from Mangles Bay Fishing Club
  • 1 representative from Rockingham Volunteer Sea Rescue Group
  • 1 representative from The Cruising Yacht Club

The Coastal Facilities Advisory Committee composition is currently:

  • 2 Councillors
  • 2 community members
  • 1 representative from Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions
  • 1 representative from Department of Transport – Marine Safety
  • 1 representative from Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development
  • 1 representative from Mangles Bay Fishing Club
  • 1 representative from Rockingham Volunteer Sea Rescue Group
  • 1 representative from The Cruising Yacht Club

The Department of Transport – Marine Safety has advised that it will no longer have a representative available to attend the CFAC meeting due to resource constraints. The Department will continue to work alongside the City and remain available to answer any queries. Considering that the Department has advised it will continue to support the City and CFAC, the resignation is expected to have minimal effect on the operation and success of the Committee.

 

EP-013/18 Change of Terms of Reference of RoadWise Advisory Committee

Advisory Committee Recommendation 1 of 1: Change of Terms of Reference of RoadWise Advisory Committee

That Council ADOPTS following Terms of Reference for the RoadWise Advisory Committee: “To provide input and advice into the development, implementation and performance of the City of Rockingham Community Plan Strategy – Road Safety, linked to the ‘Towards Zero’ State Road Safety Strategy 2008-2020.” as the revised Terms of Reference for the RoadWise Advisory Committee.”

Officers Recommendation

That Council ADOPTS following Terms of Reference for the RoadWise Advisory Committee: “To provide input and advice into the development, implementation and performance of the ‘City of Rockingham Road Safety Action Plan’ linked to the ‘Towards Zero’ State Road Safety Strategy 2008-2020.” as the revised Terms of Reference for the RoadWise Advisory Committee.”

The Officer’s Reason for Varying the Advisory Committee Recommendation

The State ‘Towards Zero’ strategy is applicable to the whole State including the City. It is the overarching document that is able to guide the road safety activities of the City. Administration does not consider that a City specific strategy is required to supplement the State strategy. It is considered that the City should develop and implement a definitive action plan to assist the City in achieving the strategic outcomes as provided in ‘Toward Zero’ and allow the City to monitor its progress against these outcomes. The action plan will enable the RoadWise Committee members to focus on specific strategic outcomes.

 

Corporate and Community Development Committee

GM-030/18 Christmas/New Year Administration Centre Closure 2018/2019

The City of Rockingham normally closes the Administration Centre over the Christmas/New Year Period, a practice commenced over ten years ago. City staff access accrued rostered days off, annual leave or leave without pay for those days other than the public holidays specified in the relevant Enterprise Agreement.

Past statistics show that there is a significant decline in customer demand during the period. The closure of local government administration offices during this period is commonplace in the metropolitan area.

In considering the forthcoming 2018/2019 Christmas/New Year period it is proposed that the Administration Centre be closed from 4:30pm, Friday 21 December 2018 to and including Tuesday 1 January 2019, reopening Wednesday 2 January 2019.The closure period is shown in the following calendar:

CoR 2018 Christmas Closure Dates

 

GM-031/18 City of Rockingham Community Plan Vision, Community Aspirations and Strategic Objectives (2019 – 2029)

The City of Rockingham Strategic Community Plan (2015-2025) was adopted by Council on 21 November 2014, and met all the requirements that are stipulated in the Local Government Act 1995 (the Act). The Act requires a full review of the Strategic Community Plan four (4) years from when it is adopted. The development of the City of Rockingham Strategic Community Plan (2019-2029) is a result of this requirement.

The City held a series of “Planning for the future” workshops and conducted surveys to determine from the community what their vision and aspirations were for the City for the next 10-20 years.

From the inputs received, the draft Community Plan Vision, Community Aspirations and Strategic Objectives (2019-2029) were developed and submitted on 17 July 2018 for Council endorsement of a 28-day community consultation period. The consultation period has now concluded. A total of 25 individuals responded, with some of them providing more than one comment.

More than 500 sets of inputs were received from the community during the initial consultation process. The groups and surveys that provided inputs into the process include the following:

  • Community members – a total of seven workshops were held at various venues across the City (10,000 random sample invites were sent to the community to attend these workshops)
  • The City’s business community (organised in conjunction with Rockingham Kwinana Chamber of Commerce)
  • Rockingham Youth Advisory Council
  • Kolbe College and Rockingham High School Students
  • The Disability Access and Inclusion Advisory Committee (DAIAC) – members were asked to provide their inputs
  • Members of the community at the Salvation Army in Rockingham
  • Visitors to the City Libraries (by providing comments on questions in a survey book)
  • An online survey to the Rock Port community
  • A public survey on Facebook
  • Rock Port working group online forum and workshop

Workshops were facilitated by Mr. Michael Smith from Black House Pty. Ltd., who is an expert facilitator, with the ability of effectively extracting the community’s aspirations from the conversations that were held. Mr. Smith also facilitated the workshops for the development of the previous two Strategic Community Plans for the City.

A Councillor workshop was held on 1 May 2018. The purpose of this workshop was to present the outcomes from the community workshops and surveys, and to identify the priority areas for the community. A representative from each of the community workshops was in attendance to support the outcomes of their workshops. There was a strong level of alignment with the feedback presented and what the Councillors believed should be the key focus areas for the City for the next ten years.

The draft Community Plan Vision, Community Aspirations and Strategic Objectives (2019-2029) represented the result of this overall process.

City staff did not participate in the workshop discussions, to ensure that the outcomes were totally driven by the community.

 

CD-022/18 Negotiation of new sublease Rockingham Central Library (Absolute Majority)

The Rockingham Central Library is located at the Murdoch University campus on Dixon Road, Rockingham. The City secured a sublease for a period of up to four years commencing on 27 January 2016 and commenced operation of the public library service on 8 February 2016. The current sublease expires on 26 January 2019 with an option to renew for a further year from this date under the same sublease conditions. The last date to exercise this option is 26 October 2018.

Previously the library operated as part of a tripartite agreement with Murdoch University, Western Australian Department of Training South Metropolitan College of TAFE (Challenger Institute of Technology) and the City of Rockingham. The partnership with these organisations was dissolved when TAFE pulled out and the City took over operation of the library in order to maintain a public library service at that site.

At the time the original sublease was negotiated the City recognised the need to continue providing a public library service in the Rockingham district. Given the short timeframe and lack of an alternative venue Murdoch University agreed to a short term sublease only which gave the City time to develop a new plan. In 2018 the City purchased a building at 18 Goddard Street for the purposes of a youth space and library. This building remains as an alternative venue pending the opportunity to enter into a longer term lease with Murdoch University.

Planning and construction of a new library building, closer to the city centre, has been included in the Community Infrastructure Plan (CIP) however this position will be updated in the upcoming Community Infrastructure Plan 2018-2028.

Initial discussions have taken place with Murdoch University and it is supportive of entering into a new sublease for a period of five years with a five year option to renew. The City would be requesting a minor change to the current conditions, being the removal of an area currently licenced to Murdoch University, however the remaining conditions of the sublease are acceptable and allow for the City to maintain the library service in the way it requires. The relationship with Murdoch is strong and the City is keen to maintain that.

The library has remained well utilised by the Rockingham community. Circulation, visitation and membership figures are comparable to the other City libraries, attendance at events by adults is the highest of the four branch libraries with a focus having been placed on activation for that sector of the community. There has been a steady increase in attendance at events for children and a larger focus is also being placed on youth events which is seeing increased attendance. Utilisation of the library by local school children is high with study groups regularly using the various study spaces on the first floor and facilities being offered to assist with their study needs, particularly during exam periods.

Entering into a new longer term sublease will offer a number of long term benefits to the City which far outweigh the benefits of a move to the building in Goddard Street.

The cost to fit out the building at 18 Goddard Street including demolition and rebuilding of the interior, the need to purchase furniture and library shelving, and extensive ICT infrastructure upgrades is estimated at $600,000 – $700,000. By remaining in the current location some minor upgrades would be required in order to better utilise the facility however these would be minimal compared with a move to Goddard Street.

The Rockingham Volunteer Centre is located within the Rockingham Central Library. With no other locations currently identified as being available or appropriate for this function the option to retain this building has wider implications for City operations.

The development of the Renaissance Technopole on the Murdoch Rockingham site is expected to reinvigorate and activate the campus. Having a library on site is of benefit to the Technopole and it would be expected that this would bring higher usage of the library and its facilities.

Rockingham Central Library has undergone significant change in the time the City has maintained the facility. The library has increased services for the community including additional programs for children, youth and adults and a change of the library layout has created more open space and more spaces for the community to use for their diverse needs. Entering into a new, longer term sublease will allow the staff to build on the work to date and continue to develop the library service to meet the demands of the community.

 

CD-023/18 Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund 2019/2020 Application Assessment and Ranking

The Community Sporting and Recreation Facilities Fund (CSRFF) is a funding program offered by State Government through the Department of Local Government, Sports and Cultural Industries (DLGSCI). The program provides financial assistance to community groups and local governments to develop infrastructure for sport and recreation. The program aims to maintain or increase participation in sport and recreation, with an emphasis on physical activity through the rational development of good quality, well-designed and well-utilised facilities.

Applicants must be an incorporated, not for profit sporting, recreation or community organisation, or a local government entity. Projects must be developed on land which is a Crown reserve, land owned by a public authority, or municipal property.

Applications for an annual or forward planning grant are accepted once per calendar year. Projects with a total cost between $200,001 and $500,000 are eligible to apply in the annual grant round for up to one third of the total project cost, to a maximum grant amount of $166,666.

Projects with a total cost over $500,000 are eligible to apply for a forward planning grant for up to one third of the total project cost, to a maximum grant amount of $2,000,000. All applications are required to be submitted to the relevant local government authority for initial review, assessment and prioritisation using the criteria developed by the DLGSCI.

Subject to Council approval, applications are then submitted to DLGSCI for assessment. Applications for the 2019/2020 annual and forward planning grants close on Friday 28 September 2018.

Three applications are being considered for submission to the DLGSCI. Two applications for the forward planning grant, both from the City of Rockingham and one application for an annual grant from the Rockingham Bowling Club.

A summary of each application is provided below.

1. City of Rockingham – Baldivis District Sporting Complex

The Baldivis District Sporting Complex (BDSC) is included in the City’s Community Infrastructure Plan (CIP) and subsequent funding has been allocated through the Business Plan. The completion of the BDSC is a high priority project for the City, with detailed planning work nearing completion. Once operational, the complex will provide approximately 8 hectares of additional active open space, a district pavilion, indoor recreation centre and outdoor hardcourts, as well as a youth recreation space.

The BDSC is being developed in multiple stages, with the first stage encompassing all civil works, establishment of services and the installation of reticulation and turf to the playing areas. The construction of the district pavilion will occur soon after, and will be the subject of a future CSRFF application.

The forward planning grant application to be submitted to DLGSCI in this round relates to the civil works, as well as installation of irrigation and turf. Subsequent applications will be submitted in future grant rounds for the construction of the pavilion, indoor recreation centre and outdoor hardcourts.

2. City of Rockingham – Koorana Reserve Master Plan

The Koorana Reserve Master Plan was recently endorsed by Council and is included in the City’s CIP, with subsequent funding allocated through the Business Plan. Once completed, the project will double the amount of available active reserve space and will provide upgraded facilities which will support female participation in soccer and cricket.

The expansion of the active reserve, as well as the provision of more car parking, floodlighting and change rooms will support the growth of the current winter tenant, and also enable a wellestablished, rapidly growing summer club to permanently relocate to the reserve. The forward planning grant to be submitted to DLGSCI is for the construction of the new active reserve, installation of floodlighting and pavilion redevelopment.

3. Rockingham Bowling Club Inc. – Synthetic green replacement

Rockingham Bowling Club Inc (RBC) was established in 1948, and the Club’s primary objective as stated in its constitution is to “foster the games of lawn bowls, carpet bowls, darts and pool, and promote social and recreational fellowship amongst members.” It has a current membership of 477 seniors.

The club facility is leased from the City, and is located on Lot 5001 Kent Street, Rockingham.

The RBC has submitted a grant application for an annual grant to assist with the cost of replacing the “B” green, one of three greens on the site.

The “B” green was installed in 2002 and needs to be replaced based on the expected lifespan of the product and an inspection completed by a greens contractor in 2014. At the time of inspection, attempts were made to repair the surface. These works were unsuccessful and the green has continued to deteriorate. It has since been deemed unusable for inter-club competition.

The Club has considered alternatives such as repair rather than replacement, and grass rather than synthetic. The replacement of the synthetic turf is considered the best option based on the high maintenance cost of grass, improved environmental sustainability by reducing water consumption and the surface being available all year round.

All three greens are required to continue to host other clubs for competition. The RBC Committee is concerned that it will experience a significant loss of membership and subsequent revenue if the green is not replaced, leading to a strain on the continued operation of the club. This could cause the venue to be unavailable for the numerous community groups which utilise the venue for community bowling events, and other ongoing events such as darts and bingo.

Following replacement of the synthetic surface, the bowling green will provide improved opportunities to host games for both club and community members.

 

Receipt of Information Bulletin

The Bulletins are the method the City uses to official keep the Councillors up to date with what’s happening in each department. As always, they are available to download and view on the City’s website.

 

Planning Services Bulletin

This Bulletin covers issues from;

  • Health Services
  • Building Services
  • Compliance and Emergency Liaison
  • Strategic Planning and Environment
  • Land and Development Infrastructure
  • Statutory Planning
  • Planning and Development Directorate
  • Planning and Development Directorate
    • Bush Fire Advisory Committee
    • Heritage Reference Group

 

Engineering and Parks Services Bulletin

This Bulletin covers issues from;

  • Engineering and Parks Services Directorate
  • Asset Services
  • Infrastructure Project Delivery
  • Parks Services
  • Engineering Services
  • Advisory Committee Minutes
    • Coastal Facilities Advisory Committee
    • Road Wise Advisory Committee

 

Corporate and General Management Services Bulletin

This Bulletin covers issues from;

  • Corporate Services
  • Governance and Councillor Support
  • Human Resource Development
  • Strategy and Corporate Communications
  • Investment Attraction
  • Legal Services and General Counsel
  • Advisory Committee Minutes
    • Australia Day Awards Selection Panel
    • CEO Performance Review Committee
    • Customer Service Review Committee
    • Global Friendship Committee
    • Governance Review Committee
    • Tourism Strategy Development Advisory Group

 

Community Development Bulletin

This Bulletin covers issues from;

  • Community Support and Safety Services
  • Library Services
  • Community Infrastructure Planning
  • Community Capacity Building
  • Community and Leisure Facilities
  • Advisory Committee Minutes
    • Christmas Festival Occasional Committee
    • City Safe Advisory Committee
    • Community Grants Program Committee
    • Cultural Advisory Committee
    • Disability Access and Inclusion Advisory Committee
    • Rockingham Education & Training Advisory Committee
    • Seniors Advisory Committee
    • Sports Advisory Committee

Motions of which Previous Notice has been given

General Management Services

GM-032/18 Revocation Motion – Item GM-028/18 2018 Customer Satisfaction Survey (Simple Majority)

Since its inception in 2009, the Annual Customer Satisfaction Survey has been sent out by post to a random selection of households. Initially the sample size was 4,000 households and in 2013 it was increased to 7,000. On 26 July 2015 a Notice of Motion was put forward by Cr Whitfield, requesting the random sample to be increased to 10,000. This motion was approved by Council on 25 August 2015, and since then a random sample of 10,000 Customer Satisfaction Surveys has been distributed annually.

At the August 2018 Ordinary Council meeting, the Manager Strategy, Tourism, Marketing and Communications proposed the following three options regarding the distribution of the Annual Customer Satisfaction survey, with the purpose of saving costs and optimising the effectiveness of the survey, and specifically recommended option 3 (Report GM 028/18):

Option 1: Reduce the number of copies sent by post to 5,000: This option would reduce the cost by $12,400.

Option 2: Not doing a 2nd mail-out: This option, in combination with sending only 5,000 surveys by post, would reduce the cost by $16,300.

Option 3: Reduce the number of copies by post to 2,000 copies, and complement this with 2,000 by e-mail: This option would provide more than the 400 responses required for statistical rigour and would reduce the cost of $29,080.

Prior to the Ordinary Council meeting on 28 August 2018, Cr Whitfield provided an Alternate Motion to Report GM 028/18. As a result, at the Ordinary Council meeting on 28 August 2018 through a 5/4 vote, Council resolved to:

1. ENDORSES option 4 – printing of 2,000 copies, 3,000 by email and 1,000 through Rock Port of the 2018 Annual Customer Satisfaction Survey.

The following Revocation Motion was submitted by Cr Elliott, Cr Liley, Cr Sammels and Cr Summers be given consideration at the Ordinary Council meeting to be held on 25 September 2018:

That Council:

1. RESCINDS the following 28 August 2018 Council Meeting resolution for Item GM-028/18 2018 Customer Satisfaction Survey :
“That Council ENDORSES option 4 – printing of 2,000 copies, 3,000 by email and 1,000 through Rock Port of the 2018 Annual Customer Satisfaction Survey”; and
2. ENDORSES proposed option 3 (2,000 printed surveys and 2,000 sent by e-mail) for the printing and distribution of the 2018 Annual Customer Satisfaction Survey.

 

Andy’s Summary

I think we’re going to go from one extreme to the other this month. Last month was a huge meeting. There were many, many people in attendance, and there were many items on the agenda that were of high-interest to residents.

This month, there’s not as much on the agenda, and much of what is, would not be considered contentious. That doesn’t mean it’s not important though. Things like the City’s Bushfire Management Plan, the City’s Community Plan Vision, Community Aspirations and Strategic Objectives, and negotiating a new lease for our central library may not be glamorous, but this is the vital work the City and Council do month in, month out.

 

More Information

The complete September Agenda, Reports and Information Bulletins can be found at the City of Rockingham website here, as can the minutes of all previous meetings.

Have Your Say

What’s your thoughts? Leave a comment below, and be part of the conversation.

 

 

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