Rockingham Art Awards Twilight Exhibition

Rockingham Art Awards Twilight Exhibition

The Rockingham Art Centre and The Gary Holland Centre were both open late earlier this month for people to come along and view the many amazing pieces of art that were entered in the 2018 awards.

I dropped in for an hour to chat with some of the artists who were present, caught the presentation from the exhibition curator and even enjoyed a quick snack from one of the food vans set up on the verge.

2018 Rockingham Kwinana Family & Domestic Violence Forum

2018 Rockingham Kwinana Family & Domestic Violence Forum

Earlier this month the Gary Holland Centre hosted representatives from a a wide range of government agencies, charities and non-profit groups for the 2018 Rockingham Kwinana Family & Domestic Violence Forum.

The marathon five hour meeting began with a presentations from the panel of local service providers, followed by sessions on key areas by industry experts.

A key point that was made by nearly every speaker was that while it appears we are going backwards because the statistics show an increase in the number of domestic violence incidents. What is actually happening is that the number of unreported incidents are decreasing.

It appears that incidents of domestic violence aren’t happening more frequently, the community is just getting better at reporting it when it happens.

That said, Sergeant Amanda Ahearn from the WA Police Victim Support Service, said they’re receiving 20-30 reports of domestic violence every night.

Family and domestic violence is still a huge issue in our community, but there are a large number of community groups that are working hard to combat this issue.

 

South Coastal Health and Community Services

South Coastal Health and Community Services was founded 25 years ago to support the physical and mental health needs of women, families and the unique, diverse communities in the Cities of Rockingham, Kwinana and surrounding areas.

Since its humble beginnings, they have grown in size and have gained a respectable reputation in the south coastal corridor of Perth through a professional, friendly team who are hopeful and bring their best.

They provide health and psychological services for women, children and the family.

Some specific areas of service are:

  • Emotional Health Counselling Services
  • Perinatal Mental Health Counselling Services
  • Family and Domestic Violence Counselling Services
  • Women’s Health Services – Female GP’s and Nurses
  • Self-Support Groups
  • Crèche Services for clients attending appointments
  • Aboriginal Health Services including antenatal, child health, primary health and advocacy services.

Visiting services to the Life-Links Hub include:

  • Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC)
  • Breast Cancer Awareness
  • Silver Chain
  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services
  • Cancer Council

Contact South Coastal Health and Community Services here.

 

Communicare Breathing Space

In June 2003, the Communicare Breathing Space program, the first residential Family and Domestic Violence men’s behaviour change program in the southern hemisphere, commenced operations as an alternative to removing women and children from their family home.

The therapeutic community provides men with approximately three months of accommodation while they undertake an intensive therapeutic program including group work, individual counselling and case management in their behaviour change journey.

The Communicare Breathing Space program provides:

  • Opportunities for men to reflect and be accountable for their behaviour and the choices they have made.
  • A structured program which supports men’s learning, offers alternatives and assists men in understanding and taking responsibility for their violence, anger and abuse.
  • An environment where access to information assists men to develop positive strategies to resolve their difficulties.
  • Referrals and links to services that meet the needs of each individual participant.
  • An extended support service, counselling and assistance post the completion of the three month program for sustained behaviour change.

The Communicare Breathing Space program is funded by the Government of Western Australia Department of Communities.

Contact Communicare Breathing Space here

 

Child Protection & Family Services

Child Protection and Family Support protects and cares for Western Australian children and young people who are in need, and supports families and individuals who are at risk or in crisis.

They work proactively with families to build safety around children, and prevent the need for children to enter the out-of-home-care system. They also support children and young people who are in out-of-home care to thrive by working with community sector organisations and foster carers to provide them with a safe, stable environment.

They provide and fund a range of child safety and family support services throughout the state including mandatory reporting investigations and training, Working with Children Checks, fostering and adoption services, counselling and outreach programs, crisis accommodation, homelessness services, and emergency services support.

Contact Child Protection & Family Services here.

 

Where to find more info

The City of Rockingham keeps an up to date list of all community support services that can be found here and a list of services available specifically for issues of family and domestic violence here.

 

Andy’s Council Meeting Summary – May 2018

Andy’s Council Meeting Summary – May 2018

It was another interesting Council Meeting last week, with decisions made that will effect every resident within the City of Rockingham. The full Council Meeting Agenda and Minutes are available online. For a quick summary of the meeting, please read on…

 

Public Questions

  • Mr James Mumme asked questions about a potential Coastal Park and planning for future generations, specifically with regards to Cape Peron.
  • Mr Tom Mannion asked questions with regards to the seaweed along the Safety Bay beaches, specifically the City’s response to the production of Hydrogen Sulphide as it rots.
  • Mr Peter Green asked questions about Cape Peron, specifically with regards to the difference between the areas zoned as a Reserve and those zoned as Port Installations.
  • Mr Reese Whitby MLA tabled a petition from residents of Baldivis with regards to parking at the local primary school.
    • On a personal note, I thought this was a bit odd. Both the primary and secondary schools are state owned, put in that location by a decision of the state, the provision of parking for the school grounds is a state issue and Mr Whitby is a member of the state legislative assembly. I don’t understand why he came to the City with the issue, but I’ll wait for the Mayors official response with anticipation.
  • Mrs Val Ashman asked questions with regards to the parking issues as mentioned above.
  • Mr Peter Campbell asked questions about the Ako Sister City Delegation.

 

Confidential Items

There were three confidential items discussed;

 

CS-007/18 Approval of building purchase under delegated authority to the CEO

The Council voted in favour of this item. This means the CEO has the authority to negotiate the purchase of a particular piece of real estate within the City of Rockingham. More details to follow in due course.

 

CD-011/18 Recommendation from the Cultural Advisory Committee Meeting held on 18 April 2018

The Council voted in favour of this and as a result an official invite will be sent to Mr Jake Moanoroa and Mr Jeff Burge, welcoming them to the Cultural Advisory Committee

 

CD-012/18 Recommendation from the Disability Access and Inclusion Advisory Committee Meeting held on 11 April 2018

The Council voted in favour of this item and as a result an official invite will be sent to Mr Gareth Goodway and Ms Jane Davies, welcoming them to the Disability Access and Inclusion Advisory Committee

 

Audit Committee

 

AC-002/18 State Records Act – Councillor Compliance

The Council voted in favour of this item. As you’d expect, record keeping for the purposes of transparency is vital for every local government. All internal City correspondence is recorded, but because Councillors use their own personal email addresses, there is concern that some things may not be captured by the record keeping system.

That said, each Councillor is already required to submit all relevant correspondence to the Records Dept. Personally, I’ve always thought it odd that Councillors weren’t provided with an @rockingham.wa.gov.au email address. Our internal auditor has made some recommendations that are now being implemented.

 

Planning and Engineering Services Committee

 

PD-015/18 Participation in the Cities Power Partnership

The Cities Power Partnership (CPP) is a free national program run by Climate Council Australia that engages with local governments across Australia to encourage environmental sustainability initiatives and provide a platform for collaboration. The CPP is Australia’s largest sustainability program aimed at local governments. It was launched in July 2017 and currently has 70 member Councils, including the Cities of Fremantle, Melville, Armadale and Kwinana in Western Australia.

The Council voted in favour.

 

PD-016/18 Final Approval of Scheme Amendment No.171 – Cash-in-Lieu of Carparking in the Primary Centre – Waterfront Village Zone

The intent of the Scheme Amendment is to clarify the wording of Clause 4.15.6.2(3) of TPS2 to appropriately reflect the City’s intentions for the calculation of Cash-in-Lieu parking payments to be based on a multi-decked car parking structure. The City’s Planning Policy No.3.2.5 – Development Policy Plan – Waterfront Village Sector (PP3.2.5) nominates locations in the Waterfront Village where multi-decked car parks may be constructed. The nominated sites for public car parks are depicted on the ‘Indicative Development Plan’, within PP3.2.5, as having potential for multi-level decked car parks.

The Council Voted in favour. This simply serves to simplify some of the existing policies regarding the future construction of a multi-story car park somewhere along the Rockingham Foreshore. The full report, including details of all public submissions are available in the Agenda, page 26.

 

PD-017/18 Proposed Street Naming Theme – ‘Paramount Estate’

This is the second time this has come to Council for consideration. In February 2018, Council resolved to support a street naming theme for the Estate based on ‘Paramount Studios Films and Actors’. An application was submitted to the Geographic Names Team for its assessment and final approval, who provided a response that the proposed names were unable to be accepted due to being non-compliant with its Policies and Standards.

As a result the owners of this sub-division are back with a new naming theme, one which should be a lot less controversial. Inspired by the Australian landscape, the new street naming theme for the Paramount Private Estate is based on ‘Australian Peaks and Ranges’ The important influence of Australia’s terrain is reflected though a selection of names ranging from the tallest mountains to lesser-known peaks in Western Australia and across the nation. Importantly, the theme provides a contrast to generally applied names relating to locally significant wildlife or historical persons, all of which have been used extensively throughout the City.

The Council Voted in favour

 

Corporate and Community Development Committee

 

CS-008/18 May 2018 Budget Review

The City of Rockingham undertakes budget reviews to monitor its financial performance against the annual budget and to review projections to the end of the financial year. This review also determines which projects will be carried over to the next budget cycle, namely the 2018/2019 Budget. Three budget reviews are presented in the year: September 2017, February 2018 and May 2018. Any variations to the annual budget arising from the review process are presented for Council’s consideration and authorisation.

The May 2018 Budget Review includes details of transactions during the July 2017 – April 2018 period and adjustments and carry forwards required to the annual budget. The document includes the following information:
1. Summary of Budget Position
2. Summary of Major Budget Amendments
3. Summary of Projects Carried Forward
4. Summary Statement of Operating and Non-operating Revenue and Expenditure by Department

The Council voted in favour

 

CS-009/18 City Business Plan 2018/2019 to 2027/2028

The City of Rockingham’s Business Plan provides a 10-year financial overview of the City’s operations. Pursuant to the Council Policy – Strategic Development Framework, the City’s Business Plan must be reviewed and adopted by Council in November and May each financial year. The last version of the City Business Plan was adopted at the November 2017 Council meeting.

The May 2018 version of the City Business Plan meets the City’s statutory requirements of the Local Government Act 1995. The City Business Plan provides allocations of financial resources to ensure that the key strategic objectives of the City are achieved. It also ensures that resources exist to safeguard standard operating functions, and ensure funding allocations are provided so capital construction programs may occur.

Of major interest to the City is its ability to finance the construction of new facilities. The project timetable for this, as demonstrated in the Business Plan, is:

The above table represents a start date only and should be read in context with the key assumptions contained in the Business Plan document and Community Infrastructure Plan (CIP). These dates may change depending on the accuracy of these assumptions

The Council voted in favour

 

CS-010/18 Rating Methodology – 2018/2019 Financial Year

The City’s Business Plan that has been adopted indicates the level of rates needed to service current and future City requirements. This plan provided detailed financial information for the City which gave clarity to rate changes needed. The City Business Plan indicated the need to generate $87.23 million in rates in the 2018/2019 financial year. The new yield from all rates for the 2018/2019 year is projected to be some $86.27 million. This does not include interim rates which are anticipated to make up any shortfall when compared against the Business Plan requirements. All money from rates is used across a wide array of services.

Setting the rates for the next 12 months is one of the biggest decisions a Council has to make. It’s also one of the most contentious. A number of Councillors had different idea’s as to what the rates should be, some higher, some lower. After a great deal of debate I’m pleased to say the Council voted in favour of the officers recommendation of 3.6%

The full report is available in the agenda. Page 130

 

CD-013/18 Draft Cultural Development and the Arts Strategy 2018-2022

The Community Development Network (CDN) established in Melbourne in 2000 to support the role of culture in local development distinguish ‘Arts’ and ‘Cultural development’ as being separate from each other. The network argues that the development of culture is the purpose of the work with the arts being the activity: “We distinguish arts from culture, with the two not being interchangeable, but art being a manifestation of culture. Through the arts we can express ourselves and therefore make, or manifest, our culture.” From the City’s perspective this involves the provision of arts and cultural experiences, events, and skills development in order to assist the people of Rockingham to create a culturally active, aware and diverse community. The process to develop the draft CDATA Strategy has included reviewing the actions and key elements from the previous CDATA Strategy 2013-2016, reviewing relevant literature, and undertaking extensive consultation and engagement with the community. This consultation identified a number of issues including:

  • A stronger Arts and Culture network locally
  • Further activation of Arts centre
  • Recognition of Aboriginal culture
  • Public Art Strategy – ongoing curation, increased presence and promotion
  • Focus on inclusivity and diversity
  • Consistent program of events and exhibitions

The Council voted in favour

 

CD-014/17 Castaways Sculpture Awards

The City’s Castaways Sculpture Awards project has been presented to the community annually for the past ten years. Initially presented each year in May, the date was changed three years ago to October to take advantage of better weather. That change involved an 18 month gap in the presentation of Castaways without any negative impacts. The Awards have grown in both stature and popularity across the years, with evaluations illustrating attendance annually of around 17,000 – 20,000 people across the week. People attend from across the City, as well as the greater Perth metropolitan area with a significant investment of funds in the food and beverage economy locally. The addition of a schools based competition entitled UpCycle has proved popular with both the schools and the community generally with 12 schools engaged in 2017.

Castaways is usually staged on the grass areas and beach directly in front of the restaurants and Peace Pavillion area. This provides a beautiful iconic location, which already attracts the community and visitors. It provides another opportunity for people already in this area, as well as attracting people specifically to the area to the benefit of local business.

Due to the Rockingham Beach Foreshore Revitalisation project due to begin in June 2018, Castaways will not be able to be staged in this area in October 2018. As such, Officers had recommended within the Draft Cultural Development and the Arts Strategy 2018 – 2022 that Castaways not be presented in October 2018. Councillors at the 10 April 2018 Councillor Engagement Session expressed concern regarding this and indicated their preference that it be staged in May 2019 instead at an alternate location. Given the iconic nature of the event, the discussions of the recent Councillor Engagement Session, and the foreshore revitalisation project commencing in 2018, City officers thought it prudent to obtain a resolution from Council regarding the timing of the next Castaways event.

It’s a shame the Castaways has to be put on hold for 2018, but once the Rockingham Foreshore Redevelopment is complete, it will be back, bigger and better than ever. The Council voted in favour

 

Motions From Councillors

These are all important topics, and I’ll be providing a summary of each of them, in more detail over the next few days.

 

Cr Joy Stewart – PD-022/18 Notice of Motion – Cape Peron

The Council voted to defer this issue to next months Council Meeting

 

Cr Andrew Burns – GM-012/18 Notice of Motion – Mayoral Civic Duties

The Council voted against

 

Cr Matthew Whitfield – GM-013/18 Notice of Motion – Live-streaming Council Meetings

The Council voted in favour

 

Cr Barry Sammels – CD-015/18 Notice of Motion – Rockingham Volunteer Sea Rescue Group

The Council voted in favour

 

For More Information

As always, all meeting Agendas, Reports, Bulletins and Minutes are available at the City of Rockingham Website here.

 

Next Council Meeting

The next Ordinary Council Meeting for the City of Rockingham will be held on Tuesday 26 June 2018 at 6:00pm in the Council Chambers, Civic Boulevard, Rockingham.

 

 

Castaways to be relaunched in 2019

Castaways to be relaunched in 2019

The City of Rockingham Council has decided to cancel the 2018 Castaways Sculpture Awards due to scheduled works on Stage 1 of the City’s Rockingham Beach Foreshore Revitalisation.

Councillors came to a unanimous decision to cancel the event at the May 22 Council meeting, with the popular awards set to be relaunched in October 2019 in the revitalised foreshore precinct.

Mayor Barry Sammels said while it was unfortunate to have to take a break in 2018, the event would be back bigger than ever next year. “The Castaways Sculpture Awards have been a huge hit with the community since first starting in 2008,”

“With works on Stage 1 of the exciting Rockingham Beach Foreshore Revitalisation set to begin in June, there would have been a clash between the two which ultimately would have impacted the quality of the Castaways Sculpture Awards. “Once Stage 1 of the Rockingham Beach Foreshore Revitalisation is complete the City looks forward to hosting Castaways again and welcoming the community to what will be a fantastic foreshore setting.”

Stage 1 of the Rockingham Beach Foreshore Revitalisation will impact the Boardwalk and beach area directly in front of the cafes and will be completed by late September 2019.

Construction will shut down during the busy summer period to minimise inconvenience to visitors and businesses, before recommencing in mid-February 2019.

The Castaways Sculpture Awards creates opportunities for emerging artists to showcase their work alongside established artists, with more than 17,000 visitors attending the exhibition last year.

 

 

City Acts Swiftly on Safety at Rockingham Train Station

City Acts Swiftly on Safety at Rockingham Train Station

A strong collaborative effort from the City of Rockingham has helped the Public Transport Authority and WA Police track down suspects involved in alleged damage to vehicles parked at Rockingham Train Station.

Following on from a series of incidents at Rockingham Train Station earlier this month, the City worked closely with WA Police to help identify the alleged offenders as well as keeping local residents aware of securing their valuables.

City of Rockingham Mayor Barry Sammels said the City had a strong working relationship with WA Police and was able to respond to the matter quickly with the use of a portable CCTV unit. “The City arranged additional Smartwatch patrols to the streets surrounding the train station,” Mayor Sammels said.

“Each Smartwatch vehicle is also equipped with CCTV which can provide direct footage to Rockingham Police Station.

Mayor Sammels also said the City provided WA Police and the PTA with dashboard cloths for residents to place in their vehicles stating ‘all valuables have been removed from the vehicle.’

“The dash cloths act as a great reminder for residents to remove any valuables from their vehicles and discourage would-be criminals from trying to break into parked vehicles,” Mayor Sammels said.

The City’s use of variable messaging signs that informed residents to remain vigilant was also praised by WA Police.

Pin It on Pinterest